Spring 2012 Courtyard Music Series

Eric Stephenian Karaoke Nights Sharaya
Levi Stephens Nazia Chaudhry Rachael Loy
Chris Cauley Jenn Grinels Nick Howard
Timbre Bishop Montana Skies


Joined by producer/engineer/musician Malcolm Burn and a select recording band, Eric Stepanian brings depth and rock and roll diversity to bear on the 12 songs of Goodnight Scarlett. After two successful band albums (Stepanian’s Autumn She Leaves and Wait Out The Rain), Eric Stepanian steps out on his own with a gripping song cycle that wraps themes of love, loss and triumph in a sensuous musical palette with new CD, Goodnight Scarlett.

Eric’s songs are charged with a sense of inner turmoil, but his gift for storytelling is what attracts, not heart on the sleeve histrionics. The songs of Goodnight Scarlett are as relevant as real life. Goodnight Scarlett rocks a miracle mile, recalls melancholic memories like rotting rose petals, and ultimately finds release in redemption and self-acceptance. Prime movers include the Stones-ish “Bittersweet”, the open wound-on-ice glam of “Everybody”, the caustically rocking “Call Me When You’re Famous”, and the cinematic, black eyed closer, “Last Goodbye”.

Eric’s song, “Criminal” was recently heard on ESPN’s Baseball Tonight; the 29 year old has opened for Maroon 5, Jason Mraz (to whom he has been compared), Rusted Root, Robert Randolph, Howie Day, Jack’s Mannequin, Matt Nathanson and Cowboy Mouth.
Tuesday, April 17, 2012
12-1 p.m.
Courtyard Stage
Student Center next to Food Court


Come sing your heart out to your favorite karaoke tunes or — if you are not much of a singer — come out and listen to the talented GSU student body. Cupcakes and coffee will be served.

Supported by Student Activity Fees.
Tuesday, April 10, 2012
5:30-9 p.m.
Courtyard Stage
Student Center next to Food Court

Free Event! No Ticket Required. Open to all students, faculty, staff, and the public.


A perfect match to her tender disposition, her lyrics are refreshingly sweet. The epitome of vulnerability, she speaks frankly to the complexities of relationships that no twenty-something-or anyone else for that matter-can escape. This artist is practical, accessible, but also delightfully fresh. As gentle as Carly Simon and bold as Aimee Mann, Sharaya has been compared by her fans to the contemporary artists Ingrid Michaelson and Sara Bareilles. This fair comparison speaks perhaps most vividly to the warmth of her melodies, to her rolling, sweeping musical stride. Sharaya’s latest single Far Field calls listeners-both musically and lyrically-to the roller-coaster of the lovesick, to memory’s involuntary ride.

Supported by Student Activity Fees.
Thursday, March 29, 2012
12-1 p.m.
Courtyard Stage
Student Center next to Food Court

Free Event! No Ticket Required. Open to all students, faculty, staff and the public.


Discovering Levi Stephens’ music is like enjoying a surprisingly great meal at the local cafe you’ve passed a thousand times before finally deciding to stop in. You thought you knew what you were getting into, but this is something more. It’s refreshing –a pleasant surprise that a new artist in an industry plagued by dying creativity chooses to follow in the tradition of those classic singer-songwriters that came before. His debut album, “This Way” goes far beyond the confines of R&B and seamlessly melds a variety of genres, from soul to rock to gospel to folk while always remaining honest, clever and conversational.

Levi’s affinity for singing can be attributed to growing up in the Washington, D.C. area in a home he remembers being filled with music. “My father was a big music head. We grew up listening to all kinds of really good music. Music was bigger than TV.” Like many artists, his musical roots began in church where Levi, like his father, sang and played the piano. Outside of the church, young Levi was exposed to artists like Stevie Wonder, Bill Withers and Donny Hathaway. In addition to those soul legends, The Beatles, Paul Simon, James Taylor, Jimi Hendrix and Prince all made their mark on Levi’s musical style and led him to the guitar which was the final piece needed to create his sound.

Supported by Student Activity Fees.
Tuesday, March 20, 2012
12-1 p.m.
Courtyard Stage
Student Center next to Food Court

Free Event! No Ticket Required. Open to all students, faculty, staff and the public.


Nazia Chaudhry (‘Naz”) is a singer, actor and voice over talent. Naz’s extensive acting and music has allowed her to share her passion for performance with children to dignitaries, and from large stadiums and concert halls to intimate jazz clubs. Additionally, Naz has performed at private functions, charity events, and talent competitions throughout the nation. In 2005, she toured internationally throughout Spain as a featured jazz soloist with Jubilate, one of South Florida’s highly acclaimed small vocal groups. She also toured regionally with Jubilate performing in concerts with Grammy Award-winning singer Bobby McFerrin, Latin Grammy Award-winning flautist Nestor Torres, actor/singers Clifton Davis and Harry Belafonte, and Metropolitan Opera soprano Marvis Martin. Naz is releasing her debut jazz album in Spring 2012 and currently pursuing a master’s in jazz studies at GSU.

Supported by Student Activity Fees.
Thursday, March 15, 2012
12-1 p.m.
Courtyard Stage
Student Center next to Food Court

Free Event! No Ticket Required. Open to all students, faculty, staff and the public.


Hard to pin down and hard to forget, Rachel Loy has always had it both ways: she’s a sweet, petite blonde who sings heartrending ballads with an aching vulnerability, and she drives her electric bass like it’s a pack of pit bulls. She rode the fleeting fame train with a major-label (Epic), Billboard-charting hit single (The Same Man) at the ripe old age of nineteen, and now, four years after making her mark, she’s ready to be discovered—again.

Since graduating with honors from Berklee College of Music in Boston, she’s recorded 2 full-length CDs, 2 EPS and has been touring the country. She will be taking a break from playing bass with TV and pop music star, Julianne Hough to release her newest self-titled EP on July 1st, as she returns to her college tours.

Find out more at: http://www.rachelloymusic.com/

Supported by Student Activity Fees.
Tuesday, March 6, 2012
12-1 p.m.
Courtyard Stage
Student Center next to Food Court

Free Event! No Ticket Required. Open to all students, faculty, staff and the public.


Chris Cauley hails from Atlanta, GA and lives and breaths SOUL music. At a young age, Chris was exposed to legends like Earth, Wind, and Fire and Stevie Wonder and from there; his passion for music was born. He began writing songs on his guitar and with the vocal influence of the afore mention influences paired with a guitar, the industry began to take note of his unique sound.

In 2005, he was the APCA Coffeehouse Artist of the Year his first year on the circuit. Chris then went on to be the #1 music act at every conference he showcased that year. He went on to work with the likes of Matt Nathanson, Amos Lee, 112, and many more. Chris then took a break from college touring after he caught the attention of a few Hollywood heavyweights.

He was invited by Justin Timberlake’s team to sit in on a private rehearsal in London with Justin and his band. Chris was then personally invited by writer/producer/director Tyler Perry to join the cast of his stage play “Laugh to Keep From Crying” on a U.S. tour. The play co-starred Chris as a graduate student who moved to the wrong part of town. This comedic r&b/gospel musical received rave reviews all over the country. Most recently in 2010, Chris was invited to join the international cast of the world renowned Michael Jackson tribute show, “Man in the Mirror” as a feared vocalist. He spent the entire summer traveling to seven different countries with the show. After traveling the world and rubbing elbows with some of the world’s most respected talents, Chris has returned home to Atlanta to gear up for a new record and make his mark on the college music scene once again.

Supported by Student Activity Fees.
Tuesday, February 21, 2012
12-1 p.m.
Courtyard Stage
Student Center next to Food Court

Free Event! No Ticket Required. Open to all students, faculty, staff and the public.


Jenn Grinels first earned her reputation around Southern California for her stage work. The award winning, professional actress is well respected for her acting as well as her gorgeous set of pipes. After the release of her first full length album, she is one of the region’s most critically lauded singer/songwriters. The self- described “soulful, bluesy, jazzy, folk rock, singer/songwriter” has been touring the country since Oct. 2007, armed with only her guitar and copies of her album “Little Words”.

With a voice that’s been described as “truly phenomenal” (S.D.CityBeat) and a sound that’s “jazzy in its pacing, soulful in its delivery, and heartfelt in its sensuous tone”(Full Value Reviews), touring artist Jenn Grinels has quickly built a loyal following that stretches from coast to coast. CrazyTalk.com says “her voice is just absurd. Two artists kept coming to mind – Martin Sexton and Fiona Apple. Sexton because of her vocal focus & control; Fiona Apple because of her tell-off confessional and conversational lyrics, her penchant for complex rhyme schemes, and her powerful, listen-up-buster delivery.” The critically lauded artist has won numerous honors and awards, including 2007 Honoring Acoustic Talent Awards for both Best Performer and Best Vocalist. Most recently she was awarded “Song of the Year” (West Coast Songwriters) for Can’t Stay Here. Music from her latest CD, “Little Words” was recently featured on MTV. The San Diego Reader puts it best: “She is the real, talented epitome of today’s best indie music.

Supported by Student Activity Fees.
Thursday, February 9, 2012
12-1 p.m.
Courtyard Stage
Student Center next to Food Court

Free Event! No Ticket Required. Open to all students, faculty, staff and the public.


Nick Howard is an award winning British Singer Songwriter who achieved mainstream success with his critically acclaimed debut album ‘Something To Talk About’, songs from which have been featured in scores of TV shows and films and received heavy rotation across radio networks in the US and in Europe. In the last two years, Nick has toured with artists such as Gavin DeGraw, Lifehouse, Jack Johnson, Boyce Avenue and Counting Crows.

Nick’s music has been featured on The Hills, Jersey Shore , Cougar Town, 90210, LA Ink, Greek, Army Wives and countless other TV shows and films. He has performed on live television in the US and UK, including appearances on NBC, Fox and the BBC. His single ‘A Better Man’ broke into the US radio charts which led him to be featured as an ‘Artist To Watch’ by US media giant, Clear Channel. He has performed to tens of thousands of people this year throughout the US and Europe.

Nick’s popularity across both continents has gained huge traction over the last 12 months and largely in part due to support slots for the likes of Lifehouse and Boyce Avenue, is now gearing up for several headlining tours in 2011. ‘When The Lights Go Up’ will be released through Ferryhouse Productions/Warner Music this April.

Find out more: www.nickhowardmusic.com

Supported by Student Activity Fees.
Tuesday, February 7, 2012
12-1 p.m.
Courtyard Stage
Student Center next to Food Court

Free Event! No Ticket Required. Open to all students, faculty, staff and the public.


Most widely known as the harpist collaborator with mewithoutYou and Anathallo, Timbre’s solo project is a unique musical experience. She combines the sounds of harp with a gentle soprano voice, often joined by her band on piano, cello, vibraphones, drums, and even a choir, to create a moving and ethereal sound.

Her live performances are always met with an awed hush, whether it be in front of thousands of people at a festival, or in a music venue or a bar, and are most often described as breathtaking and enchanting.

With an impressive history on her instrument, Timbre proves that a classical education can bring a truly unique and cultured sound to modern music. She has won competitions on the harp throughout her career, including a Curb Sponsored Concerto Competition for the Nashville Symphony, and has performed at Carnegie in April 2010.

Supported by Student Activity Fees.
Tuesday, January 31, 2012
12-1 p.m.
Courtyard Stage
Student Center next to Food Court

Free Event!
No Ticket Required.
Open to all students, faculty, staff and the public.


Bred from the love of blues and folk, WL. Bishop’s music finds itself at a stranded crossroads playing to the hum of crickets and power lines. Inspired by late nights turned early mornings and the longing for a comfort found only in salvation or lack thereof, his songs tell the stories of people far and long ago, as well as those of his own journeys.

Bishop’s live performances show great breadth in style and depth lyrically. From the bluesy heart of songs such as Vegas and Old Man Williams to the traditional lyrical stylings of Stories and Time and Days, his performance brings the audience close while keeping them on their toes. Soulful harmonica playing can be found amongst the tunes as well, making appearances for soul-drive movements amidst the warming vocals.

Visit www.WLBishopMusic.com for more information.

Supported by Student Activity Fees.
Tuesday, January 24, 2012
12-1 p.m.
Courtyard Stage
Student Center next to Food Court

Free Event! No Ticket Required. Open to all students, faculty, staff and the public.


Jonathan and Jennifer Adams met while studying music at the University of Georgia in Athens, Ga. Recognizing a kindred spirit in each other’s devotion to their music, the desire to share music was ignited immediately.

The two assumed they would be performing classical recitals and great works for the cello and guitar; then, in one trip to the library to select music, their whole world of classical intentions came crashing down. The discovery: music written for cello and guitar was as rare as the combination itself — no great classical works existed. What resulted from this new musical freedom of expression between the two was the formation of Montana Skies and a unique style of music that would garner instant recognition and praise.

Jonathan explains, “The fact that ‘ready-made’ repertoire is not available for our combination of instruments is really what pushes us to be more creative with our music. We love composing and arranging, and appreciate the opportunity to present old favorites, along with newer music, to our audiences.”

Combining elements of classical technique, jazz improv and the power and energy of rock ’n’ roll, Jonathan’s guitar wizardry and Jenn’s blazing electric cello combine to create a sound that is truly remarkable. While the music defies simple categorization, it is a fusion in the truest sense of the word. It’s been called everything from chamber rock to psychedelic strings. Whatever you want to call it, rest assured, this ain’t your granny’s chamber music.

Supported by Student Activity Fees.

Thursday, January 12, 2012
12-1 p.m.
Courtyard Stage
Student Center next to Food Court

Free Event! No Ticket Required. Open to all students, faculty, staff and the public.

Twitter