Fall 2011 Courtyard Music Series

Karaoke Nights Branigan Tall Heights
Trey Griffin Noah Hoehn Lindsey Stirling
Elliot Holden Timbre Chinua Hawk

Come sing your heart out to your favorite karaoke tunes or — if you are not much of a singer — come out and listen to the talented GSU student body. Cupcakes and coffee will be served.

Supported by Student Activity Fees.
Free Event! No Ticket Required.
Open to all students, faculty, staff and the public.

Wednesday, November 16, 2011
7-9 p.m.
Courtyard Stage
Student Center next to Food Court
Tuesday, October 11, 2011
5:30-9 p.m.
Courtyard Stage
Student Center next to Food Court
Tuesday, September 13, 2011
5:30-8 p.m.
Courtyard Stage
Student Center next to Food Court


Rodney Branigan calls his music “progressive folk fusion,” but that doesn’t do it justice. Clearly, he’s invented a new genre –– one that blends rock, folk, flamenco, madrigal, classical, bluegrass and jazz –– and, it all works. Branigan plays music so compelling that you have to listen to it. It stuns the audience and hushes the room.

Supported by Student Activity Fees.
Tuesday, November 8, 2011
12-1 p.m.
Student Center Ballroom

Free Event! No Ticket Required. Open to all students, faculty, staff and the public.


Boston’s favorite acoustic duo, Tall Heights has wowed countless audiences on tour around New England. In just one year, Tall Heights has been invited (and invited back) to colleges and universities like Wesleyan, Brown, Smith, Hampshire, Dartmouth, Becker, Holy Cross, Wheaton and more.
Classically trained cellist Paul Wright soars soulful vocals over his cello. Tim Harrington sports a striking vibrato above folk- and rock-influenced acoustic guitar. Critics agree: it’s the harmonies –– vocal and instrumental alike –– that create a sound and atmosphere more intimate, moving and memorable than the countless drums-and-bass indie set-ups on the scene today.
The magic developed on the streets of Boston when Tall Heights was selected from hundreds to take residency at Faneuil Hall’s world-renowned street performer program. Under the Artist Development Program at the storied Long View Farm Studios, they recorded their debut album, Smoke Signals, at the Long View location as well as at Spirithouse and Northfire Recording Studios in western Massachusetts. Tall Heights released Smoke Signals to a sold-out crowd of 200 in the heart of Boston.
Tall Heights has headlined Boston venues including Club Passim, Lizard Lounge, Café 939 and Brighton Music Hall, to name a few. They have shared stages with and garnered praise from national acoustic acts like David Wilcox, Barefoot Truth, One Eskimo and the Adam Ezra Group.

Supported by Student Activity Fees.
Thursday, November 3, 2011
12-1 p.m.
Courtyard Stage
Student Center next to Food Court

Free Event! No Ticket Required. Open to all students, faculty, staff and the public.


Trey Griffin is a senior at Georgia State and has been playing piano since elementary school. He is currently working with a number of different bands in the Atlanta area and enjoys playing classical and jazz music.
Although he is currently involved with music, after graduation he plans to focus his attention on screen writing and short film production.

Supported by Student Activity Fees.
Tuesday, October 25, 2011
12-1 p.m.
Courtyard Stage
Student Center next to Food Court

Free Event! No Ticket Required. Open to all students, faculty, staff and the public.


Noah Hoehn is a fierce performer. His impassioned harmonica performances and sincere dedication to his craft gained him national acclaim as a winner of the prestigious McKnight Fellowship for Performing Musicians not once, but twice. Hoehn’s energetic and distinctive playing has been heard in concert halls, festivals and on national radio programs.
Now it is his solo show that is truly unequaled. His singular vision to unite the sounds of new blues and marimba pop is accomplished with an incomparable live looping system. Saucy harmonica and cool marimba are looped and layered upon a foundation of acoustic grooves, freeing him to sing and play at the same time. Because he programmed the MIDI sequences for his looper, fusing technology with his songs, he is called “a modern day musical scientist.”

Supported by Student Activity Fees.
Thursday, October 6, 2011
12-1 p.m.
Courtyard Stage
Student Center next to Food Court

Free Event! No Ticket Required. Open to all students, faculty, staff and the public.


Ever since Lindsey Stirling was a little kid she has been extremely creative. She loves to put a fun twist on every aspect of life. As a little girl, she loved writing plays for the neighborhood kids and making the costumes. Now she enjoys jazzing up her classical violin skills with some rock and hip hop as well as her dancing.
Stirling was a popular favorite on this season’s America’s Got Talent, where she was known as the Hip Hop Violinist. After her performance, Sharon Osbourne said, “Wow . . . we loved Lindsey. If she can make Piers Morgan smile, you know she will give you the show of a lifetime.”
Morgan called her “electrifying.” By combining 18 years of training with her sharp dance moves, Stirling plays and dances, and everyone has the chance to join in the party.

Supported by Student Activity Fees.
Tuesday, September 27, 2011
12-1 p.m.
Courtyard Stage
Student Center next to Food Court

Free Event! No Ticket Required. Open to all students, faculty, staff and the public.


Elliot Holden is one of the hottest new talents to emerge on the scene in recent years. His new CD Radiance has received critical raves and substantial airplay throughout the Southeast.
With his trio The Elliot Holden Group, he has built a strong regional following and earned opening slots with such acts as The Derek Truck Band and Dirty Dozen Brass Band.
Holden was featured in Guitar Player Magazine’s Spotlight, and his fiery playing has been compared to that of Eric Johnson, Jeff Beck and Jimi Hendrix. However, the scope of Holden’s influences reaches far beyond the pantheon of guitar virtuosos.

Supported by Student Activity Fees.
Thursday, September 22, 2011
12-1 p.m.
Courtyard Stage
Student Center next to Food Court

Free Event! No Ticket Required. Open to all students, faculty, staff and the public.


Most widely known as the harpist collaborator with mewithoutYou and Anathallo, Timbre’s solo project is a unique musical experience. She combines the sounds of harp with a gentle soprano voice, often joined by her band on piano, cello, vibraphones, drums, and even a choir, to create a moving and ethereal sound.
Her live performances are always met with an awed hush, whether it be in front of thousands of people at a festival, or in a music venue or a bar, and are most often described as breathtaking and enchanting.
With an impressive history on her instrument, Timbre proves that a classical education can bring a truly unique and cultured sound to modern music. She has won competitions on the harp throughout her career, including a Curb Sponsored Concerto Competition for the Nashville Symphony, and has performed at Carnegie in April 2010.

Supported by Student Activity Fees.
Thursday, September 8, 2011
12-1 p.m.
Courtyard Stage
Student Center next to Food Court

Free Event! No Ticket Required. Open to all students, faculty, staff and the public.


Singer, songwriter, entrepreneur — these are just some of the words that can be used to describe Chinua Hawk. Although born and raised in New Jersey and now residing in Atlanta, Hawk considers himself a “citizen of the world.”
Hawk has released three independent CDs and is currently working on his fourth. His work has been heard on television shows, such as CBS’ “Joan of Arcadia,” and in movies such as “First Sunday.” He has also written songs with Wyclef Jean and performed backing vocals on his CD “The Preachers Son” and worked in the studio with producer/rapper Kanye West on rapper Talib Kweli’s song “Just To Get By,” which appeared in Dave Chapelle’s movie “Block Party.”

Supported by Student Activity Fees.
Thursday, August 25, 2011
12-1 p.m.
Courtyard Stage
Student Center next to Food Court

Free Event! No Ticket Required. Open to all students, faculty, staff and the public.

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